DEBUNKING THE MYTH OF THE “DAY OF” PLANNER, by WIPA

The Wedding Industry Professionals Association most recently wrote an article titled,   DEBUNKING THE MYTH OF THE “DAY OF” PLANNER.    Here is the article with the link, this will explain the services of a day of planner vs. a Wedding Director for the day of.   Here is the Link: http://www.wipausa.org/pdf/debunking_myth_of_same_day_planner.pdf

Every couple deserves a wedding planner and many recognize the exceptional value of having one. However, because of current terminology some couples anticipate they can hire a planner just for the day of the wedding. The facts are: the “Day of Planner” does not exist. The term was picked up by the public and has made its way into the everyday vernacular.  wedding is to fully understand their vision and what they have contracted with their team of vendors.

The pre-wedding meetings, vendor confirmations, review of vendor contracts, timelines, planning, referrals, production schedules, venue logistics and walk through typically require a minimum of 25 + hours for any experienced planner. The day of the wedding will be an additional 10-15 hours. The planner will be on site early, directing set up and implementing the client’s vision. This allows the couple to be relaxed and to enjoy their day.
Every couple wants the day to run flawlessly. A professional Wedding Director is a planner with the experience and knowledge to make the day run smoothly and effortlessly by coordinating the vendors and the venue; orchestrating an effective timeline and overseeing the often complicated logistics.

By hiring a Wedding Director the client will receive the service and expertise they deserve to make the wedding day run perfectly.

In light of this, the Wedding Industry Professionals Association (WIPA) recommends the terminology “Wedding Director” to replace “day-of planner”.

No couple wants someone to walk in and pretend to run the show with no prior knowledge of their wedding or preparation! The only way a planner can successfully execute a client’s

wedding is to fully understand their vision and what they have contracted with their team of

vendors.

The pre-wedding meetings, vendor confirmations, review of vendor contracts, timelines,

planning, referrals, production schedules, venue logistics and walk through typically require a

minimum of 25 + hours for any experienced planner. The day of the wedding will be an

additional 10-15 hours. The planner will be on site early, directing set up and implementing the

client’s vision. This allows the couple to be relaxed and to enjoy their day.

Every couple wants the day to run flawlessly. A professional Wedding Director is a planner with

the experience and knowledge to make the day run smoothly and effortlessly by coordinating the

vendors and the venue; orchestrating an effective timeline and overseeing the often complicated

logistics.

By hiring a Wedding Director the client will receive the service and expertise they deserve to

make the wedding day run perfectly.

 

  

 

Holiday Etiquette By Emily Post

As the holidays  approach us, everyone is always asking what do I do now that we have to entertain, what do the kids do, what about the gifts, what about the thanks you’s.  People can drive themselves into a frenzy trying to figure it all out.  27 Miracles seems to be always called upon when it comes to etiquette on how to because we are an event company.  We share with all our clients that tabel etiquette, gift giving etiquette and thanks you’s is easy when you follow Ms Emily Posts etiquette.  Click on the link here for this week’s topics on holiday etiquette to include, table manners, table conversations, gifts you don’t need to wrap, greetings and handshakes, and the all too important gift giving and receiving gifts from someone.

http://www.emilypost.com/holiday-a-celebrations/277-5-day-manners-makeover-for-the-holidays-?showall=1

By Cindy Post Senning

The holidays are coming! Decorations are popping up everywhere. Holiday music is playing in stores. People are planning turkey dinners. Families will be traveling to visit families. Parents may be stressing. And kids are beside themselves with excitement.

Parents ask me, “What can we do? The kids are wild, and we’ve left table manners by the wayside. Is it too late?”  No, it’s not too late to spruce up the manners you want your children to know before the craziness sets in. You can help them by sharing a five-step manners makeover before Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Each step is designed to be a “spruce up the manners” lesson.

christmas-gifts_2

Step 1: Table Manners

Step 2: Table Conversation

Step 3: Gifts You Don’t Wrap

Step 4: Greetings and Handshakes

Step 5: Giving and Receiving Gifts

No more than one hour a day. Make it fun. And talk with your kids about manners. Ask them why manners are important and which ones they think make the most sense. Help them understand this isn’t about “rules,” it’s really about how we get along with each other. The goal is to make this a positive experience and then to enjoy the holidays!

 
Welcome to the “Spruce Up the Manners” – Step One!

Holidays typically mean meals; meals mean table manners.   So let’s begin there:

 Practice setting a simple table setting:  fork on the left, knife and spoon on the right (knife next to the plate), glass on the right above the knife and spoon. (The kids can help with the table decorations – make holiday place cards, ask the kids to make up a seating plan, create a special holiday centerpiece – not so high you can’t see over it!)

Then review the basics and practice, practice, practice:

 

  1. Wash up.
  2. Napkin in lap.
  3. Wait until all are served or the hostess begins to eat.
  4. Please and thank you.
  5. Hold utensils properly.
  6. Chew with your mouth closed.
  7. Offer to help clear.
  8. Thank you to the cook!

Next we’ll take a look at the social side of a holiday meal: the table conversation.
The art of dining includes several things: the table setting which brings order and beauty, the menu which delights the taste buds, and the conversation that brightens the day! The following tips will help your children learn the art of table conversation.

  • Talk to people on both sides of you and across the table.
  • Volume: Not too loud; not too soft.
  • Don’t talk with your mouth full! (If it’s a problem, try putting a mirror in front of your child during a meal, so she can see how it looks.)
  • The art of small talk: Suggest topics like the weather, sports, local events, school and then practice. Avoid questions that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” Instead use who, what, where, when, and how. Here are some practice questions. Help your kids make up their own:
    1. “What did you think of the ball game last night?”
    2. “What was the sledding like after that snow storm?”
    3. “I heard you won the state spelling bee last week! That is so cool…What comes next?”
    4. “Mom says you went to Spain last summer. Can you tell me about it?”
  • Avoid talking about personal family issues.

Practice at each meal this week. Who knows? Maybe you’ll learn something about your children you didn’t know. And, better yet, maybe they’ll learn something about you!

We all love to wrap gifts, but some of the things we can give at the holidays can’t be wrapped. By spending an hour with your children and talking about this concept, you will raise their consciousness about these special gifts.

  • Kindness
  • Consideration
  • Helping out

Preparing for company

Decorating

Helping with shopping

Cleaning the house

As part of the discussion you  have with your kids, create a list of these special gifts that they would like to give. Include the “gift” and who it’s for, when and how they’ll give it, and how they think it will be received.

Greetings and handshakes are social skills – and like every skill it takes practice to get them right and to feel comfortable using them. Also, it’s much easier to learn and practice with someone you know well so try out that greeting and handshake in familiar settings with friends and family.

Let me say it again! Practice with siblings, neighbors, and dolls and stuffed animals – every day!

Greetings

Look them in the eye and SMILE!

Speak clearly

Say the person’s name

Add a “Glad to see you” or “How’s it going?”

If it’s a relative or close friend, add a hug.

Handshakes

Right hand to right hand – palm to palm; thumbs up

Firm grip – not too tight; not too limp

Two to three pumps then release

History of handshake: In olden days, knights extended a hand to show it did not hold a weapon and they were approaching as friends not enemies. The other person responded showing he didn’t have a weapon either. The handshake was a gesture of friendship in the olden days and still is today.

Greetings and handshakes are skills that will serve your children well far beyond the holiday season so take this opportunity to be intentional about teaching them. It’s really a gift for them from you!

Spend this last hour helping your kids learn gracious gift giving and receiving. 

Gift Giving – In order to help your kids learn the joy of giving make the time to have them participate in gift shopping or making gifts they will give during the holidays. Then practice these interactions:

  1. Look at the person and smile.
  2. Hand them the gift and say clearly, “This is for you. I hope you like it.” Or “Here, I made this especially for you.” Help your kids with the language of giving.
  3. Watch the person open their gift and feel the delight that comes with giving.

Gift Receiving – Remind the kids that when someone has given them a gift, she has spent some time picking it out, wrapping it, writing the card, or maybe even making the gift. It’s important to show your care and respect by opening the gift with a sense of joy and then expressing thanks!

  1. Look at the person giving you the gift and smile.
  2. Focus on the person and the gift – not something you opened just before.
  3. Thank you, thank you, thank you. We don’t express our appreciation enough and you can’t stress it enough with your children! If you can’t thank the giver in person send a note right away!
  4. (If they don’t like the gift, teach them to find the positive thing they can say, to say it, and then to say thank you. “This shirt is the best color blue. Thank you so much.”)

Five days; five lessons – with these basics your children will do well during the holidays. They know what’s expected and they have the skills to meet those expectations. They know what they can expect from others. There is a confidence that comes from the knowledge.

Approach this time together positively. Engage your kids in conversation about ways to make things smooth with people they know well and people they are meeting for the first time. You be making the holidays less stressful for yourself and your children.

Happy Holidays from all of us at The Emily Post Institute!

Wedding Gift Etiquette/Emily Post

A bride most recently asked me about the do’s and dont’s of wedding thanks you cards.  I provided the information, but I got to thinking, who better than Ms Manners herself, Emily Post to give the etiquette in full detail to our subscribers. Read the article she wrote in full detail here.  I hope this will be helpful to all.

 http://www.emilypost.com/wedding-registries-gifts-and-thank-yous/167-wedding-thank-yous

There is nothing more appreciated than a lovely handwritten thank-you note. Some tips from Peggy Post on turning this obligation into a pleasure not a chore.

When should notes be written?

Contrary to popular myth, the happy couple does not have a year’s grace period. All thank you notes should be written within three months of the receipt of the gift. Ideally, a response should be written on the day you receive a wedding gift. If that’s not possible, set a daily goal. It’s a lot easier to write three or four notes a day than to have to write a hundred notes in a month after the wedding!

What stationery should be used?

First of all, stationery is the operative word here: No fill-in-the-blank cards, no pre-printed cards, no phone calls, no emails and no generic post on your website!

Who needs a note?

  • Anyone who gives you an engagement, shower or wedding gift, even if you have thanked them in person. Individual notes should be written to people who contributed to a group gift.
  • Anyone who gives a gift of money: cash, checks, contributions to savings accounts and donations to charities. Mentioning the amount is optional, but it does let the person know the correct amount was received. You should mention what you plan to do with the money.
  • Your attendants. A warm personal note attached to your gifts to your attendants will let them know how much you appreciate their efforts and support on your behalf.
  • Anyone who hosted a party or shower for you. Ideally these notes should be written within two days of the event. Each host or hostess should be thanked individually with a note and a thank you gift.
  • People who house or entertain your wedding guests. A note and a small gift should be sent to anyone who houses or entertains out-of-town wedding guests.
  • People who do kindnesses for you. The neighbor who accepts delivery of your gifts when you are at work; the cousin who supervises the parking at the reception – anyone who assists you before, during or after your wedding.
  • Suppliers and vendors. You don’t have to write everyone you hire for services, but anyone who exceeds your expectations will appreciate a courteous note of thanks.
  • Your parents or whoever is hosting your wedding.

Ten Do’s and Don’ts of Thank You Notes

  1. Do personalize your notes and make reference to the person as well as the gift.
  2. Do remember that a gift should be acknowledged with the same courtesy and generous spirit in which it was given. 
  3. Do be enthusiastic, but don’t gush. Avoid saying a gift is the most beautiful thing you have ever seen unless you really mean it. 
  4. Don’t send form letters or cards with printed messages and just your signature; don’t use email or post a generic thank you on your wedding web site in lieu of a personal note. 
  5. Do promptly acknowledge the receipt of shipped gifts by sending a note right away or calling and following up with a written note in a day or two. 
  6. Don’t mention that you plan to return a gift or that you are dissatisfied in any way. 
  7. Don’t tailor your note to the perceived value of the gift; no one should receive a perfunctory note. 
  8. Do refer to the way you will use a gift of money. Mentioning the amount is optional. 
  9. Don’t include wedding photos or use photo cards if it will delay sending the note. 
  10. Don’t use being late as an excuse not to write. Even if you are still sending notes after your first anniversary, keep writing!

 

There is nothing more appreciated than a lovely handwritten thank-you note. Some tips from Peggy Post on turning this obligation into a pleasure not a chore.

When should notes be written?

Contrary to popular myth, the happy couple does not have a year’s grace period. All thank you notes should be written within three months of the receipt of the gift. Ideally, a response should be written on the day you receive a wedding gift. If that’s not possible, set a daily goal. It’s a lot easier to write three or four notes a day than to have to write a hundred notes in a month after the wedding!

What stationery should be used?

First of all, stationery is the operative word here: No fill-in-the-blank cards, no pre-printed cards, no phone calls, no emails and no generic post on your website!

Who needs a note?

  • Anyone who gives you an engagement, shower or wedding gift, even if you have thanked them in person. Individual notes should be written to people who contributed to a group gift.
  • Anyone who gives a gift of money: cash, checks, contributions to savings accounts and donations to charities. Mentioning the amount is optional, but it does let the person know the correct amount was received. You should mention what you plan to do with the money.
  • Your attendants. A warm personal note attached to your gifts to your attendants will let them know how much you appreciate their efforts and support on your behalf.
  • Anyone who hosted a party or shower for you. Ideally these notes should be written within two days of the event. Each host or hostess should be thanked individually with a note and a thank you gift.
  • People who house or entertain your wedding guests. A note and a small gift should be sent to anyone who houses or entertains out-of-town wedding guests.
  • People who do kindnesses for you. The neighbor who accepts delivery of your gifts when you are at work; the cousin who supervises the parking at the reception – anyone who assists you before, during or after your wedding.
  • Suppliers and vendors. You don’t have to write everyone you hire for services, but anyone who exceeds your expectations will appreciate a courteous note of thanks.
  • Your parents or whoever is hosting your wedding.

Ten Do’s and Don’ts of Thank You Notes

  1. Do personalize your notes and make reference to the person as well as the gift.
  2. Do remember that a gift should be acknowledged with the same courtesy and generous spirit in which it was given. 
  3. Do be enthusiastic, but don’t gush. Avoid saying a gift is the most beautiful thing you have ever seen unless you really mean it. 
  4. Don’t send form letters or cards with printed messages and just your signature; don’t use email or post a generic thank you on your wedding web site in lieu of a personal note. 
  5. Do promptly acknowledge the receipt of shipped gifts by sending a note right away or calling and following up with a written note in a day or two. 
  6. Don’t mention that you plan to return a gift or that you are dissatisfied in any way. 
  7. Don’t tailor your note to the perceived value of the gift; no one should receive a perfunctory note. 
  8. Do refer to the way you will use a gift of money. Mentioning the amount is optional. 
  9. Don’t include wedding photos or use photo cards if it will delay sending the note. 
  10. Don’t use being late as an excuse not to write. Even if you are still sending notes after your first anniversary, keep writing!

 

Tribute to the US Marines and the Toys for Tots drive

During the holiday season you see a lot of places that have collection boxes outside their office or place of business collecting for toys for tots.  Sometimes people go through the motions of just placing a toy in the box, but not really taking a moment to think of what is actually happening.

The Objective as listed on the website:

OBJECTIVES:
“The objectives of Toys for Tots are to help less fortunate children throughout the United States experience the joy of Christmas; to play an active role in the development of one of our nation’s most valuable resources – our children; to unite all members of local communities in a common cause for three months each year during the annual toy collection and distribution campaign; and to contribute to better communities in the future.”

27 Miracles had the honor of US Marine Robert Ward and his partner attend the 27 Miracles Christmas Extravaganza on December 2.  US Marine Robert Ward spoke about the reason that they do this collection.  He shared with us that due to the deployed soldiers there are only 10 Marines in Central Florida involved in this toy drive.  That is not nearly enough help.  But these men and women give up their time during the holiday season to do this service for the communities that are in need. 

Thank you to all that attended the event, we collected 4 full boxes the day of the event and another box the week after……

http://orlando-fl.toysfortots.org/local-coordinator-sites/lco-sites/about-local-toys-for-tots.asp

While there at the Extravaganza, 27 Miracles wanted to honor not only US Marine Robert Ward, but other guests that were in the service at some point, with a tribute  to them.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZZf619DIpo

KBJ Photography Presents “27 Miracles Christmas Extravaganza”

Bruce Johnson/Owner of KBJ Photography and Fireman in the Osceola County District, Gave His christmas Away when he decided that he wanted to photograph 27 Miracles Christmas Extravaganza.  Bruce and 27 Miracles have worked several events and weddings together and when this team gets together, here is the product that they can put out!!!   Thank you Bruce for the memorable pictures…..The pictures really captured the joy that everyone had as we welcomed  Christmas 2010 !!!!

Watch the video below for pictures….

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5cviVS4s_w

27 Miracles and Volunteers are Making a Difference This Holiday Season

As we start the busy holiday season we sometimes get wrapped up in the hustle and bustle of shopping, baking, cooking, and decorating and holiday parties.  But we forget to stop and take a moment to enjoy our loved ones.  Let this season 2010 be the one where we don’t save all our love for Christmas Day but we give it all year round and believe in Christmas Miracles.

This was sung at the 27 Miracles Christmas Extravaganza by Laura Knowles and Christopher Gaitan both Music Majors at Rollins College of Music in honor of the Winter Garden Boys and Girls Club..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2ulYpoNXC0

 

Selena and Alberto Hoyos Gave Their Christmas away from life Dance International:

Studio K Dancers Yessenia Myers and Mike Schroeder Gave Their Christmas Away:

Every vendor that worked this evening donated their service to this event, there is no doubt that they gave their Christmas away to someone who needed it, but there is one vendor that gave his Christmas Away and quietly slipped out of sight that evening before the Formal Thank you’s were given on this night.  he has the biggest heart in my book.  He took on the catering of this event for 27 Miracles Christmas Extravaganza and made sure that each child present had a hot meal in their tummies.  That is not a small task to do.  His staff attended to the vendors that came out to work that night from 1pm in the afternoon in his own private dining room before the start of the event and then made sure that all the guests were butler served for their appetizers and deserts.  He made sure that we had enough hot cocoa and cider for the chilly night ahead.

His name is Michael Scorsone of Winter Garden Pizza Catering Company.

http://www.wintergardenpizza.com/index.html

For Women Undergoing Cancer Treatment

Please pass this information on to bless a woman going through Cancer treatment. This organization serves the entire USA and currently has 547 partners to help these women. It’s our job to pass the word and let them know that there are people out there that care. Be a blessing to someone and pass this information along.

Cleaning for a Reason FREE housecleaning – 1 time per month for 4 months while she is in treatment.  maid service in her zip code area arrange for the service.   http://www.cleaningforareason.org/

If you know any woman currently undergoing Chemo, please pass the word to her that there is a cleaning service that provides

All she has to do is sign up and have her doctor fax a note confirming the treatment. Cleaning for a Reason will have a participating